Reading

Reading opens doors to adventures, opportunities and brighter futures Reading is the gateway to learning, opening doors to faraway adventures, new possibilities and promising futures. Without strong reading skills, children will face a host of difficult challenges throughout their lives. That’s why we know that reading matters. As we progress through the school year it is important to strive to reach a goal for reading of between 200 to 250 nights across the school year. Each day a book/s are sent home with each student. Please ensure your child reads between 20 – 30 minutes each night and that this reading is recorded every day. Below are some thoughts on why reading matters….

 

 We are all extremely busy so sitting down on the couch together doesn’t always work. Be creative on how you fit the time in, for example read in the car to and from activities or while you are waiting for different things. Take every opportunity as it does produce results.

We are all extremely busy so sitting down on the couch together doesn’t always work. Be creative on how you fit the time in, for example read in the car to and from activities or while you are waiting for different things. Take every opportunity as it does produce results.

Independent Reading at FNPS

The beginning of the year has seen students start to develop their reading stamina with the introduction of independent reading and book boxes school wide.

Independent reading is children's reading of text — such as books, magazines, and newspapers — on their own, with minimal to no assistance from adults. Independent reading is part of the process of having readers start to think about their reading. There are strong associations between independent reading and reading achievement, and many researchers believe that independent reading plays a key role in the development of reading fluency (speed and ease of reading), vocabulary, background knowledge, understanding, and even spelling.

Not surprisingly, motivation also is associated with independent reading; children who are interested in and motivated to read tend to do more independent reading. To foster independent reading stamina within the classroom, teachers are slowing building the number of minutes read. Each team has set a target for the number of minutes read within each year level. As part of the instructional process with having students independently reading, this year also sees the introduction of book boxes. Within the book boxes, students have a number of ‘just right books’ (books that are not too hard or too easy – goldilocks thinking) available just for them. They have chosen these books due to enjoyment, interest in different book series, books by a favourite authors, non fictions books, newspapers, and so on or at times can be teacher directed.

 

Benefits of Home Reading

Benefits of reading home There are many benefits of reading at home with your child. Below is a small list of some of the benefits that top the list. Each child at Fitzroy North Primary school is expected to read at least 4 or 5 nights a week.

1. Children who read often and widely get better at it. After all, practise makes perfect in almost everything humans do, and reading in no different.

2. Reading exercises our brain. Reading is a much more complex task for the human brain rather than watching TV, for example. Reading strengthens brains connections and builds NEW connections.

3. Reading improves concentration. Children have to sit still and quietly so that they can focus on the story when they are reading. If the read often, they will develop the skill to do this for longer.

4. Reading teaches children about the world around them. Through reading a variety of books children learn about people, places, and events outside of their own experience.

5. Reading improves vocabulary and language skills. Children learn new words as they read. Subconsciously, they absorb information on how to structure sentences and how to use words and other language features effectively in their writing and speaking.

6. Reading develops a child's imagination. As we read our brains translate the descriptions we read of people, places and things into pictures. While we are engaged in a story we are also imagining how a character is feeling. Young children then bring this knowledge into their everyday play.

7. Reading helps children to develop empathy. As children develop they begin to imagine how they would feel in that situation.

8. Reading is a fun. A book or an e-reader doesn't take up much space and is light to carry, so you take it anywhere so you can never be bored if you have a book in your bag.

9. Reading is a great way to spend time together. Reading together on the sofa, bedtimes stories and visiting the library are just some ways of spending time together.